Events

7th Online Meeting of the Asian Epistemology Network

Date: Sunday, November 28, 2021.
Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).

Registration link.

1st session: Transformative Injustice
Speaker: Kunimasa Sato (Ibaraki University).
Commentator: Emily McWilliams (Duke-Kunshan).

2nd session: Propositional Justification is Not Necessary for Doxastic Justification
Speaker: Bada Kim (Kansas University).
Commentator: Giacomo Melis (University of Stirling).

Kunimasa Sato (Ibaraki University): Transformative Injustice
Abstract: Since Miranda Fricker presents testimonial injustice as a wrong that undermines one’s capacity as an epistemic subject, a primary harm of testimonial injustice has been understood as epistemic objectification (as argued, e.g., by Aidan McGlynn). In brief, epistemic objectification deprives one of the ability to seek truth and renders them mere objects from which perpetrators can glean information. However, Fricker also underscores another type of primary harm: inhibiting the formation of our selves or our identities due to prejudiced exclusion from “the process by which we become who we deeply, perhaps, essentially, are” (Fricker, *Epistemic Injustice, *p. 53). It seems that this primary cannot be fully explained in light of epistemic objectification, as the undermining of identity formation does not necessarily deny the subjectivity of the victims. Rather, they are granted their subjectivity in so far as they accord with the interests of the majorities and the powerful. Gaile Pohlhaus names those who suffer such mistreatment “truncated subjects.” Although Fricker considers this type of primary harm to be as serious as epistemic objectification, it has not been closely examined in subsequent literature. A possible reason for this may be that it is not obvious why a harm that inhibits one’s self-formation can be a distinctively epistemic kind of injustice. This presentation critically extends Fricker’s argument about the inhibition of one’s self-formation to articulate a distinct form of epistemic wrong: transformative injustice. First, I argue that when one is unduly excluded from trustful conversations in a thick human relationship through persistent and systematic testimonial injustice, one can be harmed epistemic self-trust (Katherine Hawley; Jeremy Wanderer). In this case, epistemic self-trust can be defined not as mere reliance on one’s epistemic faculties but as trust in oneself as an epistemic subject, and thus, it is both epistemic and personal (e.g., K. Dormandy). Second, I demonstrate that the loss of such epistemic self-trust makes one vulnerable to constitutively and causally biased construction, and consequently, this can thwart one’s potential to shape identity as a full epistemic subject. Third, I argue that the identity as an epistemic subject is transformative in that one has the potential to change earlier interests and to neutralize epistemically bad stereotypes. Hence, a primary harm that undermines such identity as an epistemic subject in persistent and systematic testimonial injustice can be construed as transformative injustice.

Bada Kim (Kansas University): Propositional Justification is Not Necessary for Doxastic Justification

Abstract: The claim that propositional justification is necessary for doxastic justification has been taken for granted. In this paper, I challenge this necessity claim by providing a case of a belief that is doxastically justified without propositional justification. The case reveals that a belief can be formed in a way that satisfies a range of accounts of doxastic justification in the existing literature, even though the belief is based on evidence that is insufficient to meet either of two potential standards for propositional justification. This conclusion indicates that the relationship between the two kinds of epistemic justification is more complicated than it has traditionally been thought to be and that any epistemological theories presuming the necessity claim should be reconsidered.

6th Online Meeting of the Asian Epistemology Network

Date: Sunday, September 5, 2021.
Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).

Session 1: Can Arbitrary Beliefs Be Rational?
Speaker: Mattias Skipper (National University of Singapore).
Commentator: Linton Wang (National Chung Cheng University).

Session 2: A conceptual engineering approach to understanding.
Speaker: Jenny Nado (Hong Kong University).
Commentator: Yuanfan Huang (Shanghai JiaoTong University)

Abstracts available here.

The meeting will take place through Zoom. To get the Zoom meeting link please register here (no Zoom account needed).

Book symposium: Justification as Ignorance by Sven Rosenkranz

Date: Monday, July 19, 2021.
Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).

Sven Rosenkranz, Justification as Ignorance (Oxford University Press, 2021)

  • 7.00 – 7.15pm: Sven Rosenkranz (Logos, University of Barcelona) – Précis of Justification as Ignorance 
  • 7.15 – 7.30pm: Martin Smith (University of Edinburgh) – Is ~K~KP a Luminous
  • Condition?
  • 7.30 – 7.45pm: Yiwen Zhan (Peking University) – Rosenkranz on How to Be Ignorant7.45 – 8.05pm: Responses by Sven Rosenkranz
  • 8.05 – 8.30pm: Q & A
  • 8.30 – 8.45pm: Break
  • 8.45 – 9.00pm: Julien Dutant (King’s College London) – Epistemic Geach failures
  • 9.00 – 9.15pm: Dan Waxman (National University of Singapore) – J = ~K~K and logical omniscience
  • 9.15 – 9.35pm: Responses by Sven Rosenkranz
  • 35 – 10.00pm: Q & A
  •  

    The Zoom registration link is here.

    5th Online Meeting of the Asian Epistemology Network

    Date: Sunday, May 9, 2021.
    Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).

    Session 1: Democracy and Epistemic Fairness: Testimonial Justice as a Founding Principle of Aggregative Democracy
    Speaker: Junyeol Kim (Kookmin University)
    Commentator: Kunimasa Sato (Ibaraki University)

    Session 2: Being self-deceived about ones own mental states
    Speaker: Kevin Lynch (Huaqiao University)
    Commentator: Winnie Sung (Nanyang Technological University)

    Abstracts available here.

    The meeting will take place through Zoom. To get the Zoom meeting link please register here (no Zoom account needed).


    4th Online Meeting of the Asian Epistemology Network

    Date: Monday, February 22, 2021.
    Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).

    Session 1: Skills as Knowledge
    Speaker: Bob Beddor (National University of Singapore)
    Commentator: Yuri Cath (La Trobe University)

    Session 2: Epistemic Paternalism and Fake News
    Speaker: Shane Ryan (Nazarbayev University)
    Commentator: Michel Croce (University College Dublin)

    Abstracts available here.

    The meeting will take place through Zoom. To get the Zoom meeting link please register here (no Zoom account needed).




    3rd Online Meeting of the Asian Epistemology Network

    Date: Friday, December 18, 2020.
    Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).

    1st session: Does Science Progress?
    Speaker: Darrell Rowbottom (Lingnan University)
    Commentators: Brad Weslake (NYU Shanghai), Xiang Huang (Fudan University)
    Note: a pre-recorded presentation is available here. The session will start with the commentators, followed by responses, and general Q & A.

    2nd session: Memory, Knowledge, and Epistemic Luck
    Speaker: Changsheng Lai (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
    Commentators: Andrew Moon (Virginia Commonwealth University), Shin Sakuragi (Shibaura Institute of Technology)

    Titles and abstracts available here.

    The meeting will take place through Zoom. To get the Zoom meeting link please register here (no Zoom account needed).




    2nd Online Meeting of the Asian Epistemology Network

    Date: Thursday, October 8, 2020.
    Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).
    Meeting host: Masashi Kasaki, Nagoya University.

    1st session:
    Kok Yong Lee, National Chung Cheng University (speaker)
    Federico Luzzi, University of Aberdeen (commentator).

    2nd session:
    Olav Benjamin Vassend, Nanyang Technological University (speaker)
    Simon Goldstein, Australian Catholic University (commentator).

    Titles and abstracts available here.

    The meeting will take place through Zoom. Register here.




    1st Online Meeting of the Asian Epistemology Network

    Date: Friday, July 31, 2020.
    Time: 7-10pm (Shanghai time).
    Speakers: Adam Marushak (South China Normal University), Ru Ye (Wuhan University), Rie Iizuka (Kansai University), Masaharu Mizumoto (Japan Institute of Science and Technology).

    Programme and abstracts available here.

    Rie Iizuka handout
    Ru Ye handout
    Adam Marushak handout

    The meeting will take place through Zoom. Register here.




    Inaugural conference of the Asian Epistemology Network

    The inaugural (not online) event will take place at Zhejiang University.

    Details will be posted as they become available.

    %d bloggers like this: